Woman detained at mental hospital

A YOUNG woman who attacked her boyfriend with a beer bottle and knife at her Dunmow flat was suffering from mental illness, a court heard on Wednesday. Jemma Fish, 20, of Knights Way, Dunmow, was before Chelmsford Crown Court for sentence after admitting

A YOUNG woman who attacked her boyfriend with a beer bottle and knife at her Dunmow flat was suffering from mental illness, a court heard on Wednesday.

Jemma Fish, 20, of Knights Way, Dunmow, was before Chelmsford Crown Court for sentence after admitting two charges of causing actual bodily harm to Paul Wild.

Judge Charles Gratwicke ordered that Fish should be detained for treatment at Runwell Hospital under the Mental Health Act.

He said he had read two psychiatric reports about Fish and said that it was clear she was suffering from a mental illness.


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Emma Nash, prosecuting, said Fish and Paul Wild had been in a relationship which started about four weeks before the incident.

On September 29 last year Mr Wild was staying at her flat in Dunmow.

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Fish had been drinking and taking drugs. Mr Wild went to bed and she went out. When she returned she went to the bedroom and asked him for sex and he refused.

Miss Nash said a fight started and she began kicking and punching him in the face.

He picked himself up and went into the front room and she struck him on the head several times with a beer bottle.

She continued to kick him while being restrained but fortunately he managed to calm her down.

Mr Wild left and when he returned he found Fish holding a kitchen knife.

She told him: "I'm going to kill you. You are going to feel pain in a minute."

Fish ran at him and caught him on the chest with the knife, but luckily he only sustained a graze.

Mr Wild struggled with Fish and managed to get the knife off her and then realised he had been stabbed in the foot.

He sustained a cut, which needed three stitches.

The court heard that a psychiatric report had diagnosed Wild as suffering from schizophrenia.

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