Two Uttlesford primary schools praised for teaching healthy eating

PUBLISHED: 09:57 13 November 2014 | UPDATED: 09:57 13 November 2014

Great Dunmow Primary garden

Great Dunmow Primary garden

Archant

The dedication of two Uttlesford schools to teach their pupils about healthy eating has been “celebrated”.

Great Dunmow Primary gardenGreat Dunmow Primary garden

Myles Bremner, director of The School Food Plan, an independent body which works to support headteachers to improve food in their facilities, visited Great Dunmow Primary School and Takeley Primary School on Friday.

He was impressed by the “amazing work” taking place at both the sites to tackle childhood obesity and to enhance young people’s knowledge of where their food comes from.

While at Takeley Primary School, a Gold awarded Food for Life partnership school, Mr Bremner gave food education lessons to each class and he also tucked into a school lunch.

He said: “Takeley is doing an amazing job at weaving a good food culture across the school. The school lunch was a delicious experience, with older children helping youngsters, teachers and pupils all sitting together in a civilised atmosphere enjoying a tasty, healthy lunch.

“The headteacher Claire Berry has embedded good health and wellbeing throughout the school, with obvious benefits for the school.”

Earlier in the day Mr Bremner planted the first cabbage in the new vegetable bed at Great Dunmow Primary School. The Friends Association has extensively developed the outside area, with the help of the gardning club, and also added a green house.

He then went on a tour of the school to hear about all the work taking place to involve food education with the entire curriculum.

“I am here to celebrate the amazing work that Mel Casey and the rest of the school has done in getting the pupils to understand where food comes from and the importance of healthy eating,” he added.

“At the same time food is part of the school life. They are not afraid to develop the normal school curriculum through food and gardening.”


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