Remember to give blood this September

PUBLISHED: 16:21 21 August 2009 | UPDATED: 07:20 30 May 2010

THE National Blood Service (NBS) is reminding blood donors to give blood in September and asking them to bring along a friend, colleague or family member to start the life-saving habit too. Blood stocks are turned over in just a few days and with the seas

THE National Blood Service (NBS) is reminding blood donors to give blood in September and asking them to bring along a friend, colleague or family member to start the life-saving habit too.

Blood stocks are turned over in just a few days and with the seasonal coughs and colds expected to start in September coinciding with many people returning to work after the summer holidays, members of the public are being asked to help save lives now.

Media and PR manager at NHS Blood and Transplant, Ruth Greenaway, said: "Only four per cent of the eligible population currently give blood so we are asking those people to come along and donate and to encourage others to do the same.

"Blood is used for a wide-range of medical procedures including cancer care, general surgery, in maternity care and for accident and emergency situations."

To be potentially able to give blood you must be aged between 17 to 65, weigh over 7st 12lbs (50kg) and be in good health. There is no upper age limit for blood donation if you have donated in the last two years.

For more information about giving blood or to book an appointment please visit www.blood.co.uk or call the donor line number on 0300 123 23 23.

YOUR LOCAL BLOOD DONOR SESSIONS

Monday September 21

2.15pm-4.30pm and 5.30pm-7.15pm

United Reformed Church, New Street, Dunmow

Tuesday September 29

2pm-3.45pm and 5pm-7.30pm

Felsted School, Grignon Hall, Stebbing Road, Felsted

BLOOD DONOR FACTFILE

1 - 7000 pints of blood are needed each day to help save and improve the lives of sick and injured patients

2 - A unit of blood is measured as 470mls (or just under a pint)

3 - The blood products taken from a donation only have a relatively short shelf life. Red blood cells, usually transfused to patients with anaemia and severe blood loss, last around 35 days. Platelets used to treat leukaemia, cancer patients and those with severe infections only have a shelf life of five days so it is vital for donors to give blood regularly.

4 - There are four main blood groups - O, A, B and AB. Group O is the most common and therefore the most in demand

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