'Keep your hands off the Dunmow bypass'

PUBLISHED: 11:08 24 August 2014

Mike Hibbs and Martin Foley in Little Easton

Mike Hibbs and Martin Foley in Little Easton

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Dunmow's 20-year wait for a bypass could have been in vain as a 700-home application threatens to make it too "congested to serve its purpose", according to officials.

Land Securities has submitted a second planning application for the development on the land west of Great Dunmow, this time including an access road which would spill traffic straight onto the bypass.

The developer has asked for this to be taken as a minor amendment to the planning application that is going to appeal in September.

However, councillors have argued this would make the bypass “hopelessly congested” due to the high increase of traffic the homes will bring.

Mayor of Great Dunmow Councillor Jonathan Cadwallader fears it will become a ‘spine road’ with vehicles joining at a number of different points.

He told the Broadcast: “The idea of a bypass where people can go quite quickly around the town is not going to happen now because they will have to slow down at all the junctions.

“I think it is a shame that the bypass is going to have all these other roads going off it. It will effectively contradict the original idea.”

Speaking about the last minute amendment, Cllr Cadwallader added: “This has thrown the protestors. I think it is a bit unfair to try to wrong foot us this way.”

Mike Hibbs, parliamentary candidate for the Liberal Democrats, added: “Dunmow has already had a lot of new housing with very little thought to the need for new schools, shops, transport links and health services.

“The proposal for the land between Dunmow and Little Easton is the wrong side of the road. There is a significant risk that the new road will become too congested to serve its purpose as a bypass.”

The Land Securities application was thrown out by Uttlesford District Council’s planning committee last August but the developer appealed the decision earlier this year.

The plans will be scrutinised by a Planning Inspectorate during a 12-day hearing which will also look at the Fairfield Partnership’s 800-home application for land between Elsenham and Henham.

The Broadcast contacted Land Securities but no one was available to comment.

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