Stroke at 27 - now teacher is giving something back

Stansted teacher Kayleigh Trainor suffered a stroke aged just 27.

Stansted teacher Kayleigh Trainor suffered a stroke aged just 27. - Credit: Kayleigh Trainor

A Stansted teacher who was just 27 when she suffered an unexpected stroke is walking 1.2 million steps to help rebuild the lives of other survivors. 

Kayleigh Trainor, assistant headteacher at Forest Hall School in Stansted, had the potentially life-changing experience five years ago, but never discovered the cause.

She said: “Feeling out of sorts, I looked in the mirror and noticed there was a drop in my face. Work colleagues looked concerned when they saw me that morning, but I brushed it off as ‘nothing serious’, thinking it was maybe an allergic reaction. 

“Searching for antihistamine at the chemist, the pharmacist told me I needed to get to A&E. Still believing it was an overreaction, I apologised for wasting everyone’s time. 

“I was rushed through, with doctors monitoring me and tests carried out. I was told I had had a stroke.


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"Surely at 27 this wasn’t possible? I’d only paid for an hour's parking thinking I was going back to work."

Fortunately she made a full recovery, and is now completing the Stride for Stroke challenge to mark the fifth anniversary of her stroke.

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Over 120 days, she is walking a total of 1.2 million steps – 10,000 steps per day - to raise money to support the 1.2 million stroke survivors in the UK. 

Kayleigh added: “Many charities are struggling to raise funds due to the pandemic, which is why I wanted to sign up for the challenge. Many people rely on the work of charities to support with their recovery, so I thought I would be able to raise some money as every little helps. Also, I did not want to get caught up in the winter slump of not being active. 

“I do look back in disbelief that I was so young when this happened and probably a bit more shocked at how casual I was about it, still trying to go to work. 

“I do feel incredibly lucky that I have made a full recovery and had no long-term impacts. It just makes you realise there is no set age for having a stroke; it can happen to anyone at any time.” 

So far, she has raised £1,063 for the Stroke Association. Support her by donating at https://bit.ly/2OfDndC




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