Help to record mammal signs for the charity People’s Trust for Endangered Species autumn survey

PUBLISHED: 10:00 13 September 2020

A native hedgehog. Picture: Emily Tray for People's Trust for Endangered Species

A native hedgehog. Picture: Emily Tray for People's Trust for Endangered Species

Emily Tray for People's Trust for Endangered Species

Wildlife charity People’s Trust for Endangered Species is running its Living with Mammals survey for the first time during the autumn, until Sunday November 29.

A grey squirrel. Picture: Nida Al-Falaij for People's Trust for Endangered SpeciesA grey squirrel. Picture: Nida Al-Falaij for People's Trust for Endangered Species

The survey asks volunteers to record the presence of mammals in their gardens or local green spaces, or signs such as footprints or droppings, and record sightings at www.ptes.org/LwM, and share photos on social media using #LivingWithMammals.

David Wembridge, mammal surveys coordinator at PTES, said: “During the spring over 1,100 people took part in our Living with Mammals survey and over 10,000 mammal records were submitted – the highest on record since the survey began 18 years ago.

“As we find a ‘new normal’, we don’t want to lose this momentum. By taking part again this autumn, we can gain a unique insight into the lives of our wild neighbours, and for the first time, see which species are seen most – and least - between August and November.”

The top five species in Spring were hedgehogs, grey and red squirrels, foxes, bats and badgers.

David added: “The results don’t necessarily mean that mammal numbers are increasing, just that, with more people spotting wildlife, we can get a better picture of how well or otherwise different species are doing, and find out what we can all do to encourage the wildlife on our doorsteps.

“For many people, that connection to nature, during a difficult time, has been a very valuable and positive thing.”

The UK conservation charity was created in 1977, and protects some of the most threatened wildlife species and habitats, providing practical conservation support through research, grant-aid, educational programmes, wildlife surveys, publications and public events.

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