Essex photograph shows what PPE does to a healthworker’s face

PUBLISHED: 15:00 29 May 2020

Nurse Karen Kirk in PPE and her face after a 12-hour shift. Pictures: FELSTED SCHOOL

Nurse Karen Kirk in PPE and her face after a 12-hour shift. Pictures: FELSTED SCHOOL

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School nurses have volunteered for the NHS during the pandemic

Nurse Karen Kirk in PPE and her face after a 12-hour shift. Pictures: FELSTED SCHOOLNurse Karen Kirk in PPE and her face after a 12-hour shift. Pictures: FELSTED SCHOOL

The impact of PPE on a nurse’s face is shown on these two pictures of Karen Kirk, a Felsted School nurse who has volunteered to work with the NHS in the pandemic.

Karen and her Felsted colleague Maria Hinchcliffe have joined the many healthcare professionals giving their skills to the health service.

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Karen has been looking after Covid-19 patients in the intensive care unit at Colchester Hospital. This has meant wearing full PPE with mask and visor for the duration of her shift.

Maria Hinchcliffe. Picture; FELSTED SCHOOLMaria Hinchcliffe. Picture; FELSTED SCHOOL

Maria is based on the wards at Lister Hospital.

Kate Cunnah, who retired last year from Felsted after many years as a school nurse, has also been called back to the NHS and is currently waiting to start her first post.

A number of former Felstedians working in the healthcare industry have also been in touch with the school including Dr Sarah Bolton, an NHS surgeon in a London hospital, Dr Pesh Kangesu working in surgery at Colchester, Dr Henry Walton an A&E registrar who is also working on the national policy response to coronavirus at NHS England, and nurse Eleni Elliott a Major Trauma Nurse Practitioner at University Hospital Southampton. They all sent messages reassuring the Felsted community that the pandemic should not stop people seeking medical advice if they are injured or feeling unwell.

Dr Sarah Bolton, who left Felsted in 2005, said: “The NHS is still open if you need other medical attention, do not sit at home and worry, your health matters.”


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