Climate change campaigner dubbed the new 'Gandhi'

PUBLISHED: 15:45 25 November 2009 | UPDATED: 07:28 30 May 2010

Pushpoinath Krishnamurthy says farewell to Cllr Michael Miller before continuing his epic journey NT_241109_Push

Pushpoinath Krishnamurthy says farewell to Cllr Michael Miller before continuing his epic journey NT_241109_Push

A CAMPAIGNER dubbed as a new Ghandi is walking hundreds of miles to highlight global warming issues. Indian-born Pushpoinath Krishnamurthy is on the march from Oxford to Copenhagen to push home the idea that everyone can join together and urge global le

A CAMPAIGNER dubbed as a new 'Ghandi' is walking hundreds of miles to highlight global warming issues.

Indian-born Pushpoinath Krishnamurthy is on the march from Oxford to Copenhagen to push home the idea that everyone can join together and urge global leaders to "save the world before its too late."

Describing himself as an "ordinary man" Mr Krishnamurthy strode on from Dunmow on Tuesday morning following a two-day stay with town councillor Michael Miller.

The town certainly had an effect on him.

"Dunmow is a quaint and lovely place" he said. "I would say it is typically English - the people have been very friendly and have supported and listened to what I am doing."

The road is long for the walker, who is aged "over 40", as was highlighted by his journey from Bishop Stortford and then on to Coggeshall.

"It took me three hours to get here [Dunmow] from Stortford on Sunday and all of Tuesday to get to Coggeshall. But it is worth it. People have to take notice of global warming and take action now.

"The world needs a cold compress just like a baby needs it when it has a high temperature without action both can die."

Mr Krishnamurthy believes that when global leaders meet in Copenhagen on December 7 - for the culmination of two years of crunch talks on global warming - they have the chance to make a "big difference by making important decisions rather than delaying further".

He added: "Global warming is killing people and we are all responsible. I have seen it in the poorest of countries.

"People in Cumbria will testify to this after the recent serious floods - they have seen what will happen in the future if we continue on the same path."

During his stay in Great Dunmow he talked to people around town and popped into the local Oxfam shop; the charity is fully supporting his trek and is the reason he began in Oxford ten days ago.

"People around Dunmow have been positive," he said. "Many have asked me why I am doing it but after a short story they can see the issues I want to highlight. Global Warming is real and it is happening now. I urge all of the residents of this town to write to their leaders, call their politicians, and take part in marches. It is the only way we can begin to change things."

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