Clay pigeon shoot goes with a bang!

PUBLISHED: 17:24 27 September 2007 | UPDATED: 21:49 29 May 2010

Olivia Thompson and coach Roger Hill

Olivia Thompson and coach Roger Hill

CLAY pigeon shooting is one of the fastest growing sports and has discovered a new-found popularity. It is also becoming more popular amongst women because it doesn t require a great deal of endurance or strength. The Pro Coach Shooting School, based at E

CLAY pigeon shooting is one of the fastest growing sports and has discovered a new-found popularity.

It is also becoming more popular amongst women because it doesn't require a great deal of endurance or strength.

The Pro Coach Shooting School, based at Essex Shooting Ground, in Fyfield, Ongar caters for all ages, sexes and disabilities and the coaches offer 35 years of experience and wins at many international competitions.

Roger Hill has won gold at the Barcelona Olympics in 1992 and has trained coaches all over the world.

On Friday (September 14) he taught Olivia Thompson and Cheryl Eagleson and myself at the shooting ground as part Ladies Day at the ground.

The class taught us the correct way to stand, hold the shot gun and view the clay disc by closing one eye.

"Clay pigeon shooting is becoming much more of a mixed sex sport," Mr Hill explained.

"Its not like tennis where a man can use his power to win against a woman, shooting is fair game for both men and women."

We shot at discs moving in three different directions; from right to left in front of us, from behind us and moving towards us.

The key to clay pigeon shooting is shooting ahead of the disc so the disc moves into the lead pellets released by the cartridge.

After the class, Olivia said: "It was really good and I really enjoyed it, I'm definitely coming back for another class."

Live animal and bird shooting was banned in Britain in 1827 but is still prevalent on the continent.

Much of the terminology used in clay pigeon shooting derives from the days when live birds and animals were used.

For instance when you want a clay disc to be released from the trap you shout pull and the disc would be released electronically.

This relates to the person who would pull the rope, which would release the live animal from the wooden trap.

At the Fyfield shooting ground you can shoot at discs that mimic the movements of different birds and animals to pigeons such as rabbits and pheasants.

The shooting school offers a number of corporate events and is the ideal location to hold a Christmas event with a difference.

Lessons start from £40 per person including 50 cartridges and clays and the school is open on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and alternate Saturdays.

The ground and classes are also suitable for disabled people and children over the age of 13 are welcome; children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent.

For more information visit www.procoachshootingschool.com or call 07836 504726.

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