African tribe put on an energetic song and dance during Dunmow school visit

PUBLISHED: 09:58 30 October 2014 | UPDATED: 10:06 30 October 2014

Maasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary School

Maasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary School

Archant

Kenyan performers livened up a school assembly on Friday morning with their captivating songs and renowned jumping skills.

Maasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary SchoolMaasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary School

The Osiligi Troupe of Maasai Warriors, from a semi-nomadic community around the village of Kisamis, 30 miles south of Nairobi, dropped by Great Dunmow Primary School during their annual nine-week tour round England.

To start of their visit, seven members from the tribe surprised the pupils by taking over the assembly and shared some of the songs and dances from their culture as well as their trademark jumping.

After their energetic performance they then spent time with class answering questions and even stayed for lunchtime.

Headteacher Kevin Watts said: “I feel it is important to give pupils opportunities they wouldn’t normally have and this was no exception. It was a great experience for the pupils to witness members of a different culture close-up and then have the ability to ask questions.

Maasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary SchoolMaasai Warrior Tribe visited Great Dunmow Primary School

“The look on the pupils faces when the Maasai tribe came into assembly was priceless. It was a great morning and was made even better when the organiser complimented the attitude and behaviour of our pupils as one of the best he had experienced.”

The Massai Warriors take part in the annual tour to provide for their families. Each warrior has about 20 people depending on them at home, so every year two or three of them swap round so more people in the community have an opportunity to earn money.

The troupe, composed of five men and two women, is currently staying in Finchingfield for their last fortnight in England, while performances take them across the south east.

John Curtin, 77, who initiated the tour for the first time 14 years ago, said: “There is no written history of the Maasai Warriors – it was always put into their songs. Their songs are told to three-year-olds, thereby preserving their history.

“The warriors tell the story of their lives in music and dance. It starts with a lullaby, then there’s a bit where they’re calling in the cattle, it takes you through their daily lives.”

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