Coffee crisis

PUBLISHED: 12:57 30 November 2006 | UPDATED: 21:27 29 May 2010

I READ with sadness your article on Starbucks coming to the town and the passion with which a 21-year-old young woman argued that Saffron Walden would be a much better place if it opened a shop in the town. I have just been to see a film about Ethiopian c

I READ with sadness your article on Starbucks coming to the town and the passion with which a 21-year-old young woman argued that Saffron Walden would be a much better place if it opened a shop in the town.

I have just been to see a film about Ethiopian coffee farmers who are struggling to survive on the price they are paid for the coffee they produce, while coffee shops like Starbucks are making fortunes for their owners.

Coffee has become a valuable commodity and coffee shops are springing up everywhere.

The public, however, need to be aware that what we pay for a cup of coffee is not getting back to the farmers and they are living and working in complete and utter poverty.

There is something wrong somewhere.

I am the first to admit that I do not understand all the ins and outs of the global trading system, but I do know that all is not fair.

Would it be possible to insist that if Starbucks is allowed to come to Uttlesford, they have to offer Fair Trade coffee?

This would be a small step towards a fairer global trading system and we can all enjoy a cup of coffee with the knowledge that we may have helped the farmers and their families.

In fact, would it not be possible for Uttlesford Council to join the Fair

Trade Association and take steps to becoming a Fair Trade Council?

Helen Evans

The Maltings

Great Dunmow

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Dunmow Broadcast